I Hate Lost

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Yes, I hate it.

It wasn’t always this way. I was entranced by the wild threads of plots, character back stories, and philosophical elements.  I delved into the vast online discussion boards and wikipedia articles about Dharma, the numbers, and the crazy theories about it all. Then I started to yell at J.J. Abrams and his writers through the TV.

“How about some answers once in awhile, you evil mind-twisting soul-stealing television crack dealers?”

Well, I wasn’t quite that eloquent. But I had to stop watching somewhere after season 3. I hate Lost.

I also love Lost. But I hate it more than I love it. A small part of my antipathy is due to a near-pathological hatred of Kate. I despise her martyr complex. I’ve begged the smoke monster or polar bears to eat her since the beginning. (When I don’t like a character on TV, I wish death upon them. It has become such a regular occurrence that my husband no longer notices when I holler “Off with his head!” at the screen like the Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland.)

But what I truly hate about Lost is the lack of resolution. Would it hurt the writers to tie up one or two loose ends once in awhile? Instead of answers, there are always more questions, more confusion, more plot twists, more desperate speculation… and then I start hollering at the television.

Uh… Earth to Laura? That’s called suspense. And it’s good!

It occurred to me a few weeks ago that this is why I’ve been having a hard time with the middle bit of my book. I know suspense is important, but I cannot bring myself to add to my heroine’s peril. I find myself making excuses to skip writing the messy parts. Instead of drawing out the suspense, I skip to the next chapter. I write something along the lines of “Heroine gets attacked by a lunatic grad student buzzed on espresso” and move on to the scene after said grad student has been sedated, arrested, or otherwise subdued. It has become my cheat to get out of writing the complicated parts of the story.

To break myself of this habit, my current assignment is to go through what I’ve written so far and remove all those one-sentence cheats with real scenes. After all, I’m the author. I know how she gets out of it, and cheating gets me nowhere. Hopefully this will help me catch up on my deadlines for my word count as I’m hopelessly behind.

As for Lost? With the promise of resolution a few weeks away, I’ll probably cave and watch the finale after catching up on the plot via wikipedia. After all, I love Lost.

But I still want the smoke monster to eat Kate.

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One thought on “I Hate Lost

  1. Noooo! I LOVE LOST, and I could write a lot of reasons why. I even love that they haven’t given us all the answers and that it’s still confusing. I’m pressed for time at the moment, but I just had to say: I really like that you’re applying this to your writing (actually writing the tough scenes). Good job!

    Also, I had to say: If you only watched through Season 3, you’re missing out bigtime. Did you watch all of Season 3? It got better toward the last few episodes, and it’s been getting better ever since. Seasons 2 and 3 are my least favorite seasons of them all, even though I LOVED getting to know the character of Ben Linus. Wikipedia won’t do justice to Season 5 (probably not seasons 4 or 6, either, but especially Season 5). You’ll end up more confused than you started if you just read about it, I think. If you can, I’d definitely recommend the DVDs/hulu for catching up.

    Okay. 🙂 Hope you have a great day! Good luck on writing your tough scenes!

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